Nina Marino’s Top 10 Book Pics

Nina B. Marino is a reader and reviewer for Righteous Pen Publications and a designer for Rose of Sharon Creations (www.roseofsharoncreations.com).   Here she posts her all-time top ten favorite books to share with all of us!

(All summaries are from the books themselves)

4131Y2M2EALGift From The Sea (by Anne Morrow Lindbergh)

In this inimitable, beloved classic—graceful, lucid and lyrical—Anne Morrow Lindbergh shares her meditations on youth and age; love and marriage; peace, solitude and contentment as she set them down during a brief vacation by the sea. Drawing inspiration from the shells on the shore, Lindbergh’s musings on the shape of a woman’s life bring new understanding to both men and women at any stage of life. A mother of five, an acclaimed writer and a pioneering aviator, Lindbergh casts an unsentimental eye on the trappings of modernity that threaten to overwhelm us: the time-saving gadgets that complicate rather than simplify, the multiple commitments that take us from our families. And by recording her thoughts during a brief escape from everyday demands, she helps readers find a space for contemplation and creativity within their own lives.

41A2+XALVhLEvergreen (by Belva Plain)

The towering modern classic of passion and  ambition that forever changed the way we see the  courageous immigrants who came to America’s shores — the  story of Anna Friedman transfixes us with the  turbulent emotions of a woman and her family touched  by war, tragedy, and the devastating secrets of one  forbidden love… bittersweet and evergreen.

91ZexYP+QJLThe Thorn Birds (by Colleen McCullough)

In the rugged Australian Outback, three extraordinary generations of Clearys live through joy and sadness, bitter defeat and magnificent triumph – driven by their dreams, sustained by remarkable strength of character…and torn by dark passions, violence, and a scandalous family legacy of forbidden love.

51NOL74ZR4LGod Uses Cracked Pots (by Patsy Clairmont)

A sidesplitting, heartwarming collection of anecdotes that turn everyday events into humorous memories that reminds us God uses us not because we are perfect, but because we are faithful.

51uP8IikesLThe Grass Is Always Greener Over The Septic Tank (by Erma Bombeck)

It’s the expose to end all exposes–the truth about the suburbs: where they planted trees and crabgrass came up, where they planted the schools and taxes came up, where they died of old age trying to merge onto the freeway and where they finally got sex out of the schools and back into the gutters.

51F0aLTWCcLA Rose in Winter (by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss)

The fairest flower in Mawbry is Erienne Fleming, the enchanting, raven-haired daughter of the village mayor. Charming, spirited and exquisitely lovely, she is beset on all sides by suitors, any one of whom would pay a king’s fortune for a place in her heart. But Erienne has eyes for only one: the dashing and witty young Yankee, Christopher Seton.

But marriage for love is not to be, for her irresponsible and unscrupulous father, crippled by gambling debts, is intent on auctioning off his beautiful daughter to the highest bidder. And in the end, Erienne is devastated to find it is the strange and secretive Lord Saxton who has purchased her—a mysterious, tragic figure who wears a mask and a cloak at all times to hide disfiguring scars gained in a terrible fire some years back.

But in the passing days, Saxton’s true nature is revealed to her. A gentle and adoring soul, he treats his new bride with warmth and abiding tenderness, yet appears to her only by daylight. She, in turn, vows to be a good and loyal wife to him. And then Christopher Seton reenters Erienne’s world Conflicted by emotions she cannot suppress, Erienne valiantly attempts to remain honorable to her elusive, enigmatic husband but feels herself irresistibly drawn to Seton’s passion, his fire, and his secrets. Entangled in intrigues she doesn’t yet understand, Erienne Fleming will soon have to make a devastating choice: between love and honor . . . between her duty and her heart.

81YS9egzy2LValley Of The Dolls (by Jacqueline Susann)

Dolls: red or black; capsules or tablets; washed down with vodka or swallowed straight—for Anne, Neely, and Jennifer, it doesn’t matter, as long as the pill bottle is within easy reach. These three women become best friends when they are young and struggling in New York City and then climb to the top of the entertainment industry—only to find that there is no place left to go but down—into the Valley of the Dolls.

61LN-oRrCXLOne Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (by Ken Kesey)

An international bestseller and the basis for a hugely successful film, Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest was one of the defining works of the 1960s.

A mordant, wickedly subversive parable set in a mental ward, the novel chronicles the head-on collision between its hell-raising, life-affirming hero Randle Patrick McMurphy and the totalitarian rule of Big Nurse. McMurphy swaggers into the mental ward like a blast of fresh air and turns the place upside down, starting a gambling operation, smuggling in wine and women, and egging on the other patients to join him in open rebellion. But McMurphy’s revolution against Big Nurse and everything she stands for quickly turns from sport to a fierce power struggle with shattering results.

With One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Kesey created a work without precedent in American literature, a novel at once comic and tragic that probes the nature of madness and sanity, authority and vitality. Greeted by unanimous acclaim when it was first published, the book has become and enduring favorite of readers.

51BwjjDD2gL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_The Burning Bed (by Faith McNulty)

The deeply moving and shocking biography of a battered wife who, after years of enduring torture at the hands of her husband, killed him rather than be killed and was acquitted. The basis of the TV movie starring Farrah Fawcett, this book brought attention to the problem over a decade ago and remains in print.

514PUDuIaUL._SX372_BO1,204,203,200_The Cry And The Covenant (Morton Thompson)

Historical fiction. Based on the life of Ignaz Semmelweis (b. 1818 – d. 1865), an Austrian-Hungarian physician known for his research into puerperal fever and his advances in medical hygiene. In the novel he struggles to prove to his fellow doctors that if they would only wash their hands, they would save the lives of many mothers.

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